Text

Depressed Midwest Issue 8

Text

Zenita

She is my best friend and I love her so much.

June, 2014. Dallas, TX.

Shot on Ilford Delta 3200.


image
image
image
image
image
image

(Source: alecozawa.com)

Text

Dallas World Aquarium

June, 2014.

Shot on Ilford Delta 3200.


image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image

(Source: alecozawa.com)

Text

When Penguins Fly

Mute grab by Matt Smith on Halloween of 2012.


(Source: alecozawa.com)

Text

Steffen Watts

Fakie Frontside Wallride from the Friends Section of Depressed Midwest #8.


Text

Rough Pacific

Barebones camping at Point Mugu, CA.

March, 2013.


(Source: alecozawa.com)

Text

Depressed Midwest on StreetCanoe.com

My friend, Jay Croft, shared issue 8 of Depressed Midwest on his website, Street Canoe

Jay runs an incredible project that posts awesome skateboarding related content and is now making tangible printed zines. Currently, Jay is working on #2 of the Street Canoe zine. Keep a look out for the affordable printed work in the near future!


Photo
Frontside 360 Air. Manhattan Beach, CA. January, 2013.

Frontside 360 Air. Manhattan Beach, CA. January, 2013.

Photo
Depressed Midwest Issue 8  The eighth issue of Depressed Midwest features skateboarding photographs, a visual recollection of The Low Down Hoe Down, pictures from a trip to Kingswell Los Feliz, and a new contributing photographer.
-
It has been almost a year since I released my last zine, and today I am elated to finally share the newest addition to my ongoing project, Depressed Midwest. Here is the eighth installment of the skateboarding zine series.
For months upon months, I have intended to finish this project and lay it to rest, but time and time again, I felt that something was missing. That it wasn’t ready. That it couldn’t meet my fantastical expectations of grandeur and awesomeness.
I think this is something that most people in creative positions experience at some point in their lifetime when they become too attached to their work. It can be incapacitating and feels near impossible to move forward or past the current project.
So I overhauled, revamped, updated, and rebranded in hopes of forcing it to become the ideal project, which in my mind continued to be elusive and unknown. And wasted a good deal of time with the silly notion that eventually creative brilliance would strike and the project would finish itself.
Projects do not finish themselves.
In this time of indecision, I continued to make photographs. I traveled more. Flew to faraway states. Spent a lot of time in cars. Rode the train. Experienced new things. Made a lot of new and hopefully lasting relationships.
And yet I still struggled to put all these sacred pictures in a package that would due them justice. To show how significant they are. They mattered so much to me, and I held onto them very tightly. I needed the perfect altar to share them with the world.
But after months of this self-inflicted agony, I realized how stupid and crazed I became over a childish and trivial thing. I took the prospect out of something that was supposed to fulfill a simple and universal goal in skateboarding: fun.
Because I was pursuing incredible expectations for myself, I set myself up for failure. I would never be able to attain the success that I so strongly desired for a project that is fundamentally goofy and stupid. At least seemingly stupid to people who do not skate.
So I gave up trying so hard.
I let go of my apprehensions and started having fun again.
This issue is the result of my experiences from the last year that skateboarding, friends, family, travel, and creativity have granted me.
Thank you everyone. I hope you all enjoy this issue as much as I did making it.

-Alec

Special thanks to everyone I had the opportunity to photograph. You are everything that makes this project possible. Thanks Amanda Hart, who is the latest contributor to this project. And thank you to all my friends and family at home and abroad. I love you all.

Depressed Midwest Issue 8
The eighth issue of Depressed Midwest features skateboarding photographs, a visual recollection of The Low Down Hoe Down, pictures from a trip to Kingswell Los Feliz, and a new contributing photographer.

-

It has been almost a year since I released my last zine, and today I am elated to finally share the newest addition to my ongoing project, Depressed Midwest. Here is the eighth installment of the skateboarding zine series.

For months upon months, I have intended to finish this project and lay it to rest, but time and time again, I felt that something was missing. That it wasn’t ready. That it couldn’t meet my fantastical expectations of grandeur and awesomeness.

I think this is something that most people in creative positions experience at some point in their lifetime when they become too attached to their work. It can be incapacitating and feels near impossible to move forward or past the current project.

So I overhauled, revamped, updated, and rebranded in hopes of forcing it to become the ideal project, which in my mind continued to be elusive and unknown. And wasted a good deal of time with the silly notion that eventually creative brilliance would strike and the project would finish itself.

Projects do not finish themselves.

In this time of indecision, I continued to make photographs. I traveled more. Flew to faraway states. Spent a lot of time in cars. Rode the train. Experienced new things. Made a lot of new and hopefully lasting relationships.

And yet I still struggled to put all these sacred pictures in a package that would due them justice. To show how significant they are. They mattered so much to me, and I held onto them very tightly. I needed the perfect altar to share them with the world.

But after months of this self-inflicted agony, I realized how stupid and crazed I became over a childish and trivial thing. I took the prospect out of something that was supposed to fulfill a simple and universal goal in skateboarding: fun.

Because I was pursuing incredible expectations for myself, I set myself up for failure. I would never be able to attain the success that I so strongly desired for a project that is fundamentally goofy and stupid. At least seemingly stupid to people who do not skate.

So I gave up trying so hard.

I let go of my apprehensions and started having fun again.

This issue is the result of my experiences from the last year that skateboarding, friends, family, travel, and creativity have granted me.

Thank you everyone. I hope you all enjoy this issue as much as I did making it.

-Alec

Special thanks to everyone I had the opportunity to photograph. You are everything that makes this project possible. Thanks Amanda Hart, who is the latest contributor to this project. And thank you to all my friends and family at home and abroad. I love you all.

Text

Happy Go Skateboarding Day!

Or happy Saturday and go skate on any other given day of the year. 

Amanda Hart and Lizzy the dog.

Chicago, IL. April, 2013.



(Source: alecozawa.com)

Text

Phil Proyce

Los Angeles, CA. January, 2014.


(Source: alecozawa.com)

Text

Takakuni Ikuma

Los Angeles, CA. January, 2014.


(Source: alecozawa.com)

Text

Reed Stark

Roof descent.

Tempe, AZ. January, 2013.


(Source: alecozawa.com)

Text

Rising Sun & Co.

Automotive details of Rising Sun & Co. in Los Angeles, CA. January, 2014.



(Source: alecozawa.com)

Text

Highway 50

Somewhere on Highway 50. April, 2013.

From Los Angeles to Chicago was the longest drive I have ever made without a map or GPS. Just keep heading east. Follow the sunrise or run from the sunset.


(Source: alecozawa.com)